Summertime Art

The Open Doors Prizing Your Power Summer Art Program continues.  It’s simply so fun to support teens as they explore different ways to express themselves.  We do it during our regular program, as an alternative to school, and now we’re doing it with our summer program, exploring how together we can create art to enrich our community.  Join our fun and enjoy the photos!

Fabric Art:  Towel Origami, featuring Mythical Creatures

Pink towel elephant
Meet Terry the Pink Elephant. (Get it? Terry? Terrycloth? We knew you got it.)
Towel Loch Ness Monster
Hello Nessie! (Questions we ask ourselves: would a Loch Ness monster made of terrycloth soak up all the water in the lake/loch?)
Towel King Kong
King Kong lives! (Extra Absorbent Version)

Nature Art

Acorns and husks
Nature Art: Starting Small
Goldsworthy inspired
Inspired by Goldsworthy — Nature Art
Inspired by Goldsworthy -- Nature Art
Creating and contemplating …
Parking Lot creation -- Inspired by Goldsworthy -- Nature Art
Art is everywhere and anywhere.

If you’re looking for educational options that respect teens — if you want to support those teens as they explore self-expression — if you’re looking for a community who can help you grow in these directions  — contact us.

Let the Prizing Begin!

The Open Doors Summer Art Program, Prizing Your Power, began today.  This week, we’ll be getting familiar with different media for creating art — painting, fabric, words, and more.  Here are some pictures of today’s goings-on —

P1080520
We doodled while we got to know each other in the Gathering Room …
P1080523
Then it was time to explore with India ink …
India ink
India ink with different brushes …
P1080527
India ink on different papers, plus the start of a canvas piece …
P1080530
Everyone thought it was a great space in which to be creative …
painted mannequin head with chess board
Yep, it’s looking to be a great summer program!

As we all grow more playful and comfortable with our creativity, the plan is to explore how art is power, and how we can communicate our passion through our art to the community.   Stay tuned!

Prizing Your Power is supported in part by the Wege Foundation as part of the Open Doors “Your Life — Your Learning!” project.

 

Searching for Summer Camp?

Summer Program Cartoon
Searching for Summer Camp — Comic by Adena Koslek 

Prizing Your Power

This Open Doors Summer Camp is like no other.

Create Art.  Change the World.  All in Six Weeks.

Who:  Any Teen in the Grand Rapids Area –  Age 12 to 18

No Previous Art Experience Required

When:  July 22 to August 28, Tuesdays through Thursdays, the center will be open 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.  Come participate as much or as little as you want — you can still have your lazy summer days and make great art on the side.

What:  Collaborate with other teens to create art for community display during Art Prize.  Channel your passion for a social issue into powerful art. We believe that everyone can express their passions, whether or not they consider themselves artistic.

Come find the artist within!

 The Prizing your Power Summer Program and this post are part of the Open Doors “Your Life! — Your Learning!” series, brought to you with support from the Wege Foundation.

 

“I’m Bored!” Four Ways to Really Help Bored Teens this Summer

As a quick Google search revealed, there are a slew of Internet articles about how to handle boredom in your teens this summer.  They suggest organizing your young person’s time, making sure they get up everyday, and limiting “screen time.”  Though we can understand the concern that teens will curl up in their bedrooms with the blinds down, watching TV all summer, all these suggestions deal only with surface issues.  Our culture has a long way to go when it comes to delving into what boredom really is for a teen and what it could mean for them.

Summer Swing
Summer can mean a time to reflect.

1.  Ask and listen.

We at Open Doors have noticed that “I’m bored” can actually mean a lot of things.  Think about how boredom feels.  It can feel restless and discontent — or it can feel lethargic or even despairing.  If we can help our teens explore that, we can find the deeper truth underneath.

For instance, complaining about being bored often means is that a teen is looking for connection with a person they care about.  They may be feeling disenchanted with the world and need help finding their inner spark again.  They may mean that they have lots of half-formed ideas about their next direction, but they need help sorting them out.  And many teens are remembering the playfulness of their younger days, and wishing for a way to recapture it.  Only when you know the deeper need underneath the complaint can you work towards a solution that really fits.

Also, keep in mind that what a parent is seeing may not be what the teen is experiencing. If the same video game has been on for hours, check in and see what it means.  The teen may be really enjoying the challenge and the chance to immerse herself in it.  Or she may be feeling disconnected and unsure what else to do.  Ask with an open mind, and listen carefully to the response to make sure you understand.

If you don’t feel able to connect with your teen in this way, that’s okay.  Many parents were not treated with this kind of respect when they were young, and they find it hard to do so with their own kids.  At Open Doors, we may be able to help with our Summer Art Program.  No art experience is required, and your teen can participate as much or as little as they’d like.  We can help them connect and sort things out — not to mention having a lot of fun along the way.

hands collaborating
Connecting with others.

2.  Be open to exploration.

For a parent, it can feel so different when a teen who was up early every day for school and activities starts sleeping later into the sunshine hours.  But exploring a new sleep schedule can mean exploring the feeling up being up at night, when the world is quiet and the night sky invites reflection.  It can mean the kind of intense half-awake dreaming that comes with dozing in the sunlight from the window.  Our culture doesn’t value the rich inner life that can be explored by spending some time just “vegging,” but it’s there, and exploring it is an important part of teen development.

Happiness
Happiness is an inside job, and often it’s found with some time spent in reflection.

Our Summer Program has flexible hours so that night owls can sleep in and still connect with others in a gentle space that honors their journey.

3.  Don’t compare.

It can be easy to comment, loudly, that the neighbor’s teens seem to be industriously running their own lawn mowing business, and hey, they’re not bored.  Resist the urge.  Every teen has his or her own journey, and you have no idea what’s going on behind-the-scenes in that neighbor’s home.

sad teen
How it feels to be compared.

If you find yourself tempted to compare, re-focus on connecting, exploring, and playing.

4.  Be playful.

As we mentioned in the first tip, many teens feel torn about growing up.  That’s a natural part of the process, and it encourages us to bring the best aspects of childhood — playfulness, spontaneity, laughter, creativity, and our honest emotions — into our more adult lives.  Model your own playfulness, and look for ways to support playfulness in your teen — whether she is with friends, family, or engaged in an activity.  Play is such a revitalizing part of life.

At the Open Doors Summer Art Program, we look for ways to bring play and creativity into community life.  We believe that a lot of adults would be more fulfilled if they found ways to integrate the childlike into their lives, and so we use all kinds of art as a medium for helping our young adults do so.

Dandelion fluff on parking lot lines
Creative fun in everyday life.

This post is part of our “Your Life – Your Learning!” series, designed to help the Grand Rapids community rethink teen learning, and brought to you with support from the Wege Foundation.

 

You Can Help Teens with a Summer Program Scholarship

Recently, Sarah Monley wrote to us.  Sarah is an intern for Bethany Christian Services, one of the largest adoption and refugee agencies in West Michigan.

Sarah wrote: “I’ve done some research on your summer program and it seems like this would be a great opportunity for some of our refugee youth to join with local youth and become part of the community in a fun, artistic way.”  We couldn’t agree more.

Refugee Foster Care at Bethany Christian Services

As Sarah says, many of these teens are in tight financial situations, and so they aren’t able to afford the program fee that we need to cover costs.  Can you help?

Your donation can help two refugee teens find a fun way to be part of their new community.

Make your tax-deductible donation now!

Spring at Open Doors

O wind, where have you been,
That you blow so sweet?
Among the violets
Which blossom at your feet.

The honeysuckle waits
For Summer and for heat
But violets in the chilly Spring
Make the turf so sweet.    

                                                                 – Christina Rossetti

The Open Doors teens have been enjoying spring by harvesting violets for salad and sap for syrup.

P1080434
Violets and greens in salad — delicious!
P1080433
eDSC_0038s Having a break while out foraging.
P1080435
Boiling maple sap for a light, almost nutty syrup.

Meanwhile, our Writing Class has been going strong.  One of our members won first in her age bracket in the annual Poetry Contest sponsored by the Dyer-Ives Foundation.  The class has moved from poetry, to story, and now to essay.  Rossetti would approve.

P1080447
Listening to another’s work.

As our regular year winds down, we look forward to sharing our six-week summer program, Prizing Your Power, an art and social justice program where teens can collaborate to make art about their favorite cause for community display.  Come in and see what we do!